Protocol #2 - Daniel Zauderer Art and Technology Protocol...

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Daniel Zauderer Art and Technology Protocol #2 It is clear, if one is at all familiar with modern philosophical thought, that both “The Age of the World Picture” and “The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Reproductibility” include powerful criticisms on modern philosophy. An analysis of these criticisms, if one is to better understand Benjamin’s and Heidegger’s qualms with modern philosophy, is important. I will focus on Benjamin’s criticisms on Kant and Heidegger’s criticisms on Descartes. For Kant, a combination of “concepts” and “intuition” lead to cognition. Intuition is brought about through the senses. And “concepts,” according to Kant, are a priori understandings that allow us to categorize sense information. Senses are not enough. Concepts are necessary if we are to understand the world in any coherent way. Kant believes that this process is eternal—unchanging. Benjamin strongly objects to Kant’s understanding of cognition.
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This essay was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course PHIL 337 taught by Professor Ryan during the Spring '08 term at Trinity College, Hartford.

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Protocol #2 - Daniel Zauderer Art and Technology Protocol...

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