Power 'On Art' - Daniel Zauderer Whose Art is it Anyway...

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Daniel Zauderer Whose Art is it Anyway, FYSM 189 Assignment: “On Art,” by Leo Tolstoy In his essay “On Art,” Tolstoy shares his set of standards by which content should be judged as art. He argues that “art,” as most people claim it to be, is too plentiful in his world; even certain already established standards as set forth by certain schools of art (“aesthetic”, “tendencious”, and “realistic” are the three he mentions) are one-sided and define too much “content” as “art.” Tolstoy further asserts that none of them addresses when content may be “commercial, insignificant, or even harmful productions” -- his main concern. Tolstoy first addresses what none of the stated existing theories do: the act of creating something new. Unless the work of art houses an idea that the artist himself at one point doubted and toiled over, and one that is new to mankind, it should not be considered art. The work must also so clearly portray the new idea that it may be perceived by every reasonably intelligent viewer who takes the time and effort to do so. Tolstoy additionally states that a piece of true art must be “important” to mankind
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This essay was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course PHIL 337 taught by Professor Ryan during the Spring '08 term at Trinity College, Hartford.

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Power 'On Art' - Daniel Zauderer Whose Art is it Anyway...

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