Chemical Senses - 1 Chemical Senses Aaron Penkszyk PSY/345...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 6 pages.

1Chemical SensesAaron PenkszykPSY/345May 23, 2016Sara Neal
2Chemical SensesSmell, taste, chemical senses, neurons, and various other pathways all contribute to the how we interpret smell and taste. The causes of smell and taste will be looked at as well as what causes losses of smell and taste. We will also look into creating an unforgettable meal and how all the senses come together to make it memorable.Smell and TasteSmell and taste affect each other as one directly influences the other. These functions are a part of our chemical sensing system or chemosensation. The two main nerves are the olfactory and gustatory. According to "Smell & Taste" (2015), Olfactory (smell nerve) cells are stimulated by the odors around us the fragrance from a rose, the smell of bread baking. These nerve cells are found in a tiny patch of tissue high up in the nose, and they connect directly to the brain.Gustatory (taste nerve) cells are clustered in the taste buds of the mouth and throat. They react to food or drink mixed with saliva. Many of the small bumps that can be seen on the tongue contain taste buds. These surface cells send taste information to nearby nerve fibers, which send messages to the brain (HOW DO SMELL AND TASTE WORK?).The ability of our body to sense chemicals also contributes to smell and taste. Thousands of free nerve endings especially on the moist surfaces of the eyes, nose, mouth, and throat identify sensations caused by hot, cold, sweet, and acidic.Make a Meal Taste BetterWhat we refer to as flavor is actually a compilation of five basic tastes. Sweet, salty, bitter, and savory are interpreted by taste buds which are located on our tongue, in our throat, and
3

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture