EdExcel-O-Level-Biology-Paper-2-2007 - Surname Initial(s...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 16 pages.

This publication may be reproduced only in accordance with Edexcel Limited copyright policy ©2006 Edexcel Limited Printer’s Log No N25300A W850/U7040/57570 4/5/5/3/ Paper Reference(s) 7040/02 London Examinations GCE Biology Ordinary Level Specimen Paper 2 Time: 2 hours Materials required for examination Items included with question papers Answer Book (AB08) Nil Tag Instructions to Candidates The paper is arranged in three sections, A, B and C. In Section A, answer ALL questions in the spaces provided in this book. In Section B, answer any TWO questions in the answer book provided. In Section C, answer any TWO questions in the answer book provided. In the boxes above, write your centre number, candidate number, your surname, initial(s) and signature. At the end of the examination, tie your answer book(s) to this question book securely with the tag provided. Information for Candidates Calculators may be used. The total mark for this paper is 100. The mark allocation is indicated at the end of each question. Marks for parts of questions are shown in round brackets: e.g. (2) . This paper has 12 questions. Any blank pages are indicated. Advice to Candidates Write your answers neatly and in good English. In calculations, show all the steps in your working. Turn over Examiner’s use only Team Leader’s use only Question Leave Number Blank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total Surname Initial(s) Signature *N25300A0116* Centre No. Candidate No.
Leave blank 2 *N25300A0216* SECTION A Answer BOTH questions 1. Read the passage below. Use the information in the passage and your own knowledge to answer the questions that follow. 5 10 15 20 Maggot cure for ‘unbeatable bug’ Maggots may be the answer to antibiotic-resistant infections that affect humans. Doctors say that maggots are able to clear up methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (known as MRSA) – the bacteria that have defeated most other drugs and have become a problem in many hospitals. Doctors even suggest that early use of maggots on infected wounds would, in many cases, reduce the need for treatment with antibiotics. It is not fully understood how the maggots work. But there are three main theories – they may produce antibacterial agents, or they may suck up the bacteria, or perhaps change the acidity of an infection. Maggots were widely used for medicinal purposes as early as 1900 but with the introduction of antibiotics in the 1940s their use died out. Now, with the rise of antibiotic-resistant infections, there is renewed interest. The maggots are used to treat ulcers, pressure sores and infections caused by diabetes. The maggots used are sterile greenbottle fly larvae. These are used because they digest only dead tissue and do not burrow down into live flesh. Other larvae, for example the screw worm, do eat living tissue.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture