DanteHUM120 - Humanities 120 18 February 2007 Count Ugolino...

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Humanities 120 18 February 2007 Count Ugolino: His Sin and Punishment in the Ninth Circle of Hell In the time of Dante, certain sins and crimes were considered a heavier offense  than others. The circumstances of the crime are considered differently with each story.  Of the many sins and punishments described in Dante’s  The Inferno , one of the more  ambiguous appears in Canto XXXIII, when the narrator of the poem describes an unusual  sight of a man gnawing the back of another man’s head. The Pilgrim’s initial horror  provokes him to speak to the man, who is more than willing to share his story. The  sinner,   who   identifies   himself   as   Count   Ugolino,   does   not   know   the   Pilgrim   but  recognizes his Florentine accent. The Count tells the Pilgrim that the man whose head he  must feast upon for eternity is Archbishop Ruggieri. The sinner wipes his mouth on the  Archbishop’s hair and begins to describe his sin. He explains to Dante that he once 
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course HUM 120 taught by Professor Patterson during the Spring '08 term at Centre College.

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DanteHUM120 - Humanities 120 18 February 2007 Count Ugolino...

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