HUM PLATO - Annie O'Brien HUM 110 Dr. Froehlich Analysis of...

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Annie O’Brien HUM 110 Dr. Froehlich Analysis of lines 25c5-26a8 and 32e3-34b5 of Plato’s The Apology In Plato’s The Apology , Socrates presents his defense to the charges brought against him by Meletus and other men of Athens. The men have accused him of being a corrupter of the youth of Athens, for promoting wickedness, denying the existence of the gods and creating his own deities. Socrates admits to the jury that he has never had to defend himself in court before and therefore does not know how to present his case. He tells the jury that his words are all true and all he has ever spoken has been the truth, and therefore had never had to use fancy words or stylized sentences to make people believe a lie. He begins his defense by confronting the various accusations made against him. Beginning in the paragraph of lines 25c5, Socrates asks Meletus if a man is better off in the company of good people or wicked people. Socrates asks whether or not it is true that being in the company of wicked people is not good for a person, and being in the company of a good person is beneficial to a man. Of course this is true, he says. He asks if there is a man alive who would rather be in the company of people who harmed him, the wicked people, or be in the company of good people, where he would be benefiting from that company? Socrates questions Meletus, asking why a man would turn others around him wicked, if it only meant that the person doing the corrupting would end up being harmed. Socrates goes on to ask Meletus why he would corrupt the youth of Athens in order to make them wicked when Socrates so clearly
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understands that being in the company of wicked people is harmful to a man. Socrates never actually denies his charges, but rather goes on to state that he may have done this, but not deliberately. And if Socrates had done this unwillingly, then Meletus ought to have approached him in private and confronted him about it there, as this would have been the most appropriate
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HUM PLATO - Annie O'Brien HUM 110 Dr. Froehlich Analysis of...

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