Atl Atl Report

Atl Atl Report - Comparing the Distance Traveled of a...

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Comparing the Distance Traveled of a Tennis Ball Using a Human Arm and Dog Toy Maureen Costura 26 September 2007
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Abstract We conducted this experiment to determine how the atlatl, which was used by many different groups of people up to 19,000 years ago, changes the distance of a thrown object (The Atlatl). In place of the atlatl, we used dog toys with tennis balls pushed into the socket at the end. From our results, it is evident that the tennis ball always went farther with the dog toy, but the accuracy was sometimes compromised. Introduction Even before bows and arrows were used, the atlatl helped humans hunt wildlife. The atlatl, which is as old as 19,000 years old, is the Aztec word for spear thrower. These weapons were developed by several civilizations, including the Aztecs, Aborigines, Incas, and Inuits. Archaeologists do not know exactly where the atlatl originated, but it is possible that it was invented several times by different cultures (The Atlatl, Atlatl Introduction Tour). This weapon consists of a dart that is thrown by using the atlatl as an “arm extension” (BPS Engineering). By extending the arm, humans were able to effectively hunt large animals (The Atlatl). The question we addressed in this lab was how atlatls change the distance of a thrown object. Since humans thousands of years ago used this tool to hunt animals, they must have been effective, and through our experiment, we determined why. Methods and Materials
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Atl Atl Report - Comparing the Distance Traveled of a...

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