Notes for Session 7 2008

Notes for Session 7 2008 - Notes for Session 7 Mental...

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Notes for Session 7 Mental Retardation - Mental retardation refers to substantial limitations in present functioning. It is characterized by significantly subaverage intelligence, existing concurrently with related limitations in two or more of the following applicable adaptive skill areas: communication, self-care, home living, social skills, community use, self-direction, health and safety, functional academics, leisure and work. Mental retardation manifests before age 18. - Intellectual Functioning: Usually estimated by an IQ test, refers to primarily to ability related to academic performance. - Adaptive Skills: Usually estimated by adaptive behavior rating scales, refers to abilities related to coping with one’s environment. Key Elements - Capabilities (or competencies) - what can a child do? - Environments - what is the environment doing to support or inhibit my capabilities? - Functioning - what do capabilities and environments look like when combined? Adaptive Skills - Communication - Self-Care - Home Living - Social - Community Use: can you navigate the community? - Self-Direction: can you motivate yourself to complete a task? - Health and Safety - Functional Academics: can you differentiate between men's and women's restroom signs? do you know when to walk at a streetlight? can you balance a check book? can you make change? - Leisure: can you entertain yourself? - Work: is there opportunity for a paid job? Prevalence of Mental Retardation - Based on a 1990 Census data, 6.2-7.5 million people are estimated to have some form of mental retardation - In other words, approximately 1 in 10 families is directly affected by mental retardation. - Most persons (85%-90%) with mental retardation are identified as being mildly retarded (IQ between 50 and 75). Broadening the Definition of Intelligence - Conceptual Intelligence: What is measured by an intelligence test. - Practical Intelligence: The ability to maintain and sustain oneself as an independent person managing the ordinary activities of daily living. - Social Intelligence: Refers to the ability to understand social expectations and to judge appropriately
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how to behave in social situations. Classification - Mild Retardation. A classification used to specify an individual whose IQ is approximately 55-70. - Moderate Retardation: A classification used to specify an individual whose IQ is between 40-55. - Severe Retardation: A classification used to specify an individual whose IQ is approximately 25-40. - Profound retardation: A classification used to specify an individual whose IQ is below approximately 25. Classification using Supports - Intermittent: Support as an “as needed basis”. Characterized by episodic nature, person not always needing the supports(s), or short-term supports needed during life-span transitions. - Limited:
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Notes for Session 7 2008 - Notes for Session 7 Mental...

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