PowerPointMingstChapter03

PowerPointMingstChapter03 - Chapter 3 Contending...

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Chapter 3 Contending Perspectives: How to Think about International Relations Theoretically
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What Is Theory? Theory is a set of propositions and concepts which explains phenomena by specifying relationships among the concepts. Theory generates HYPOTHESES » Specific statements positing a relationship among variables By testing interrelated hypotheses, theory is verified and refined, and new relationships are found
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Levels of Analysis in International Relations
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Theory in Brief Key actors View of the individual View of the state View of the international system Beliefs about change Major theorists States, nongovernmental groups, international organizations Basically good; capable of cooperating Not an autonomous actor; having many interests Interdependence among actors; international society; anarchy Probable; a desirable process Montesquieu, Kant, Wilson, Keohane, Mueller Liberalism / Neoliberal Institutionalism
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Development of the Liberal Tradition 18th century Enlightenment » individuals are rational » people have capacity to improve their condition » Kant—anarchy overcome through collective action 19th century liberalism » individual freedom and autonomy in democratic state » free trade and commerce create interdependencies reducing likelihood of war 20th century idealism » Wilson—war is preventable
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Neoliberal Institutionalism Why do states choose to cooperate? Prisoner’s dilemma—cooperation because in self interest Institutions may be established for cooperative purposes
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REALISM / NEOREALISM Key actors View of the individual View of the state View of the international
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This note was uploaded on 02/12/2009 for the course PLSC 212 taught by Professor Krause during the Winter '09 term at Eastern Michigan University.

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PowerPointMingstChapter03 - Chapter 3 Contending...

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