Simple Harmonic Motion Lab Report - Department of Physics Course Number C Course Title S Semester\/Year In Instructor TA Name PCS125 Physics Electricity

Simple Harmonic Motion Lab Report - Department of Physics...

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Department of Physics Course Number PCS125 C Course Title Physics: Electricity & Magnetism S Semester/Year 2/1 In Instructor Iryna Manzhos TA Name Aditya Pandya Lab/ Tutorial Report No. 2 Report Title Simple Harmonic Motion Section No. 41 Group No. N/A N/A Submission Date Feb. 9, 2015 Due Date Feb. 10, 2015 Student Name Student ID S Signature* Muhammad Faraz Shahid xxxx65704 xxxx (Note: remove the first 4 digits from your student ID) *By signing above you attest that you have contributed to this submission and confirm that all work you have contributed to this submission is your own work. Any suspicion of copying or plagiarism in this work will result in an investigation of Academic Misconduct and may result in a “0” on the work, an “F” in the course, or possibly more severe penalties, as well as a Disciplinary Notice on your academic record under the Student Code of Academic Conduct, which can be found online at:
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Objective: The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the relationship between oscillating mass in a spring system with simple harmonic motion of masses that are also oscillating. There were two main parts of this experiment. There were two parts to this experiment. In part one the objectives were to: measure the position and velocity as a function of time for an oscillating mass and spring system, compare the observed motion of a mass and spring system to a mathematical model of simple harmonic motion, and determine the amplitude, period, and phase constant of the observed simple harmonic motion to develop a deeper understanding of behaviour of SHM. In part two the objectives were to: examine the energies involved in simple harmonic motion to test the principle of conservation of energy and whether SHM applies. Spring is a mechanical device that stores energy. Simple non-coiled strings such as bows have been used throughout the history of mankind. During 3 rd century B.C., a Greek engineer Ctesibius of Alexandria came up with the process of making springy bronzes by increasing the proportion of tin in the copper alloy, casting the part, and hardening it with hammer blows. [3] Then, in 2 nd century B.C., Philo of Byzantium, another catapult engineer made the same device. [3] Simple Harmonic motion is a back and forth motions, the best example for simple harmonic motion is pendulum. [3] Many pendulum clocks run on the principle of simple harmonic motion. This experiment is significant as it not only provides students with a hand-on exercise to visualize simple harmonic motion (SHM), but it also helps them to understand on how to interpret the motion of a spring under SHM to find numerous important parameters such as amplitude and period of motion as well as the phase constant for the motion. This experiment also provides students with the knowledge of how can the law of conservation of energy can be applied to an object under SHM to represent motion of an object in SHM in terms of energy equations (i.e. kinetic and potential energies).
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