BIB - Thesis: The epic nature of the film Gone with the...

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Thesis: The epic nature of the film Gone with the Wind can be attributed to both the innovative technology of Technicolor, as well as the creative, yet volatile disposition of its producer. Add how the themes of the movie including women helped increase the film’s popularity Ebert, Roger. "Gone With the Wind." Chicago Sun-Times 21 June 1998. The infamous award-winning film critic, Roger Ebert, shows the importance of history in the success of Gone with the Wind. Many of the characters in the film portrayed Americans and the issues that plagued them in the Thirties. Just like Scarlet, women in the thirties were free-spirited and “modern”, having to work outside of the home for the first time due to the economic situation. The black actors also showed how segregation, much like slavery, was prevalent through much of the South. The film was released during the rise and fall of era of promiscuity and also one of segregation. Ebert shows that the success of Gone With the Wind is explained by the historical events
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2009 for the course ENGL 101 taught by Professor Various during the Spring '07 term at UNC.

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BIB - Thesis: The epic nature of the film Gone with the...

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