Family Studies December Exam.1

Family Studies December Exam.1 - Family Studies December...

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Family Studies December Exam  Interdisciplinary Defined  Vanier Institute of the Family: - Childless couples - Two people coming together for any of those reasons creates family  - Same-sex couples - Family created over time  - Family can be created by a large group of friends  - Foster care, taking in a nephew or neighbour’s child - Vanier does not say that family has to start with marriage - Key ingredient: procreation or adoption, socialization of children, social control (if child  vandalizes parents are responsible), LOVE.  - History: element of time - Sociology: function of family - Biology: birth and genetic relatedness - Law or social policy: encompasses all adoption or placement laws - Anthropology: mutual consent forming kinship - Human ecology: management of resources Statistics in Canada  - Hung up on marriage, common- law, or lone parent with child - Emphasizes a family being people who share a household  - Does not include any element of time or mutual consent (fictive kin) or placement 
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- Fictive kin: close family friend you consider family ( you call them Uncle Bob even  though they aren’t your uncle) - Actual definition: A married couple with or without children, a couple living common-law  with or without children, or a lone parent of any marital status with at least one child  living in the same dwelling. - So this definition includes marriage, but clearly indicates that marriage is not a  requirement for a family to be formed - Stats Can 2001:  - Biology: birth and genetic relatedness - Law or social policy: encompasses all marriage, cohabitation, and adoption laws - Geography: requiring some families to reside in the same dwelling Differences and Similarities between the Vanier Family and Stats Can - Similarities:  - May include childless couples - May include same-sex couples - Requires two or more people: lone parent must have a child living with them - Differences: - Stats Can does include an element of time and mutual consent (fictive kin) or placement:  cant come to “feel like family” or children are only obtained through birth or adoption - Stats Can does not describe the responsibilities of family members and therefore does  not describe the function of the family  Anne Marie Lambert - She mentions that there has to be  2 generations of person (through  procreation) in order  to be considered a family: related through blood, adoption, cohabitation or marriage
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- Twin brothers or sisters living together as adults wouldn’t count as a family because  there is only one generation represented Each definition serves its own purpose for research  Family Studies Interdisciplinary in 3 ways:
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Family Studies December Exam.1 - Family Studies December...

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