EE_320_Intro_Optical_Engineering

EE_320_Intro_Optical_Engineering - EE320 Introduction to...

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Unformatted text preview: EE320 Introduction to Optical Engineering Spring 2009, 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Professor Qiming Zhang 225 BE West Office for Office Hrs: EE East 127 11:15 am — 12:30 pm T & Th Office hrs: 4:00 — 5:30 pm Monday (additional office hrs will be added if needed) Phone: Phone: 863-8994 (Office at MRL). e-mail: glegaxpsuedu Textbook: Optics E. Hecht Reference: Optics and Photonics F. Graham Smith, Terry A. King, and Dan Wilkins Introduction to Optical Engineering Francis T. S. Yu and Xiangyang Yang Course outline: Geometric Optics: 0 Reflection, image formed by mirrors (4.2.3-4.4, 5.4) - Snell’s law, refraction, prism and dispersion (4.7 and 5.5) 0 Image formed by refraction on curved surfaces and thin lens, ray tracing (5.1-5.3) 0 Optical instruments, aberration (5.7, 6.3) I [F . Graham Smith, Terry A. King, and Dan Wilkins’s book: chapter 1, chapter 2, and chapter 3] 0 [Yu and Yang’s book: 1.1, 1.3, 11.5, 2.1, 2.2, 2.4, and chapter 3] 0 Exam #1 ‘ Wave Optics . o Maxwell equation and waves (chapter 2, 3.6.4, and chapter 7) - Polarization, boundary conditions, refraction and reflection coefficients (Fresnels’ law) (46, chapter 8) Interference and coherence of light (7.1, chapter 9, and chapter 12) Diffraction, Rayleigh resolution, Franhofer and Fresnel diffractions (chapter 10) Wave optics instruments (including the dielectric mirrors, grating, and F-P etalon) [F. Graham Smith, Terry A. King, and Dan Wilkins’s book: chapter 4, chapter 5, chapter 7, chapter 8, chapter 10, and chapter 13] [Yu and Yang’s book:1.2, 1.6, 1.8, 8.1, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, chapter 9] o Exam#2 " Advanced Optics: Optic communication and fiber optics (5.6) Quantum optics (3.3) Introduction to laser (12.12-12.13) Fourier optics (11.3) ' Hologram (13.3) Introduction to light detectors [F . Graham Smith, Terry A. King, and Dan Wilkins’s book: chapter 6, chapter 14, chapter 15, chapter 17, chapter 19, and chapter 20] 0 [Yu and Yang’s book: chapter 4, chapter 6, 7.2, 7.3, 8.3, chapter 10, and chapter 12] Grading policy: Homework 10% Exam #1 25% Exam #2 25% Final Exam 40% Class policy, exams, and some suggestions: There will be about ten homework assignments during the semester, and your HW grade will be based on eight of them (the ones with higher scores). Homework should be turned in before the due time at BB main office. The graded HW will be returned to you after the classes. The homework assignment will also be posted in the course web—site in addition to the distribution at the class. The solution to the HW problem will be available at the course web-site after the HW due date. Dates for middle term exams: Exam #1: 7:00 pm m 8:30 pm, February 12 Exam #2: 11:15 am — 12:30 pm (class time), April 2 The final exam will cover most of the course materials discussed in the class during the semester. Exam #1 and #2 will cover the topics taught during each period. You will be allowed to bring one page of study guide (size below 8 1/2”x11”) for each exam. If you have a conflict with a scheduled exam, please notify me in advance so that suitable arrangement can be made. Lecture notes will be distributed at the class and will be posted at the course web- page after the class. You are encouraged to discuss your homework problems with your classmates. Please come and discuss with me on any problems and issues related to the course or send me an e-mail. In many cases, it may just be a very small misunderstanding on a subject, which can add several hrs onto your homework time. I can help you get a better understanding of these subjects. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. No question is a stupid question. Many times your fellow classmates have similar questions and are also afraid to ask. ><ma Some notations used in the class Refractive index I n (n 2 1) Frequency (Hz) v Object distance S _ ( So“) Image distance 8’ ( 3;) Speed of light in vacuum 0 (=3)th8 m/s) Speed of light in an optic medium with refractive index=n v = c/n ' Focal length ' f Wavelength 2. Relation between wave length, velocity, and frequency: v = v A, . U _ ‘ M Wave vector k (= 21mm) ( . if; I'M: 10 W} {Laj- {M SM Light intensity I [we AT A 06% > Angle 9, a, [3 (please note the difference between “degree” and “ E \H . H m all ) Us ~. 3. a U - wflmfl j 5 to. W “3 Malina > f I F 5am. Mmflimotfic FflyuXaS. OWE EMFMQZ/VITWM‘} . .. . 7, . _ .dgmt ' ‘fié'; ”finrmm& (““BC) ,if/ I}: 359% amiamq ~_—~7_ _ qbaqfi‘tn IMMW‘V HELM} We» 5‘ .. _ ._____._..i-.?1Qm£Mslmg 334.6%” “M Li 1) $3}th mm M 5f our» 010% Mum . 1%}? Liam ud‘aw-‘L , WLQM QT (3—024 d‘mh (ma. muQ-«uw “1‘0 Gmfi-(st, 15L} Juana-Q— H— ww is %. Fax-EVRWM‘Q {mic/J4; 65v- _ LGMZW—G “LEI “>ri 11 MW I 41453.3 M U (fling LC h <4 < 6:) (a am 519%“; kwwMJC’Fa’r Maw-(jig, {14 mm W QM/sg) Y®EM+MQ M W HM! Li M41 wi‘Hx Cx‘cdfbf {Mecca/M3 C 0?- Cmtd‘r") ,_.. w-Q M” Cam Eula +0 fig-£3. ELEM. * Lat/m) 5f M’WS Wi‘SStx'G'M : L W frauds in SW? fiUr We. mfifim (ff/3y; VMAMWQ: (Ls %M§L bag fiMV‘Q WM) 63ka [3 W3 om wall] LLMjX‘Wm WW 1] Cam l» ’7 m . LIN c J 5.; w “flit-333 6?“ [in am tsp/die Vweg-wa J (£315? \rQ/QAfiOt‘ Wm [/2 cg»— m Smafiy. M M {H Uncamé if nzw, what as w M “f bodice m flu; (in SKWSS SCCLSS‘ : 1 3X {0 S’m/S f‘i‘ *Qxlo‘s-Im/S w— 452%”3 L. a Sim-e”, S‘Kfl h>/- if +96. W8. 6% MEL/'1‘ (a vacuum is {fig HEM/3'} I! M CT .CU (EVA- w. cm" .. V .(g.. \LL.UCLQLILU.M~, V; C ....ch: SHQNM/s), ...
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