Annotated Bibliography - Epilepsy

Annotated Bibliography - Epilepsy - Nick Buttler 11 March...

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Nick Buttler 11 March 2008 EN 1123-19 Dr. Harris "Epilepsy." familydoctor.org . Dec 2007. American Academy of Family Physicians. 4 Mar 2008 <http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/common/brain/disorders/214.htm l>. This article is addressed to the epileptic. The first section tells what epilepsy really is and what it is not. It is a brain disorder, but not a mental disorder; and it is not considered epilepsy until multiple seizures occur. The article also discusses the symptoms of a seizure, such as confusion, muscle spasms, loss of consciousness, etc. The second section discusses what to do to an epileptic if they do have a seizure. Stay calm, don’t move the epileptic around, put a pillow under their head, etc. The third section is simple. Take your medicine every day if you’re on seizure medicine. The fourth section says to take your medicine as soon as you realize you forgot a dose if you did. The fifth section says not to take extra medicine if you’re about to have a seizure. The doctor prescribed your amount for you for a reason. The sixth section explains that you can go off your medicine depending on what your doctor says. Some factors are how long you have been seizure free, how quickly the seizures were controlled, and other illnesses. The seventh section says to ask your doctor before taking other medicines as they may interfere with the seizure medicine. The eighth section says to avoid alcohol if you’re epileptic. It can make seizures
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easier to occur, and it can interfere with the medicine. The ninth section says that seizures can affect an unborn baby during pregnancy, as well as the seizure medicine. The tenth section explains that the laws about driving with epilepsy vary from state to state. The 11 th section says to call your doctor if anything changes about the way you seize or if you change your medicine. "Epilepsy - Home Page." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . 11 Oct 2007. CDC. 4 Mar 2008 <http://www.cdc.gov/Epilepsy/>.
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This article starts out explaining that epilepsy results in different types of seizures and that they come from abnormal brain activity that cause changes in the body’s movement. Statistic time! 2.7 million Americans have epilepsy. $15.5 billion are spent on epilepsy every year. The young and elderly are the main people whom epilepsy affects. Ten percent of all Americans will have at least one seizure in their life. Three percent are diagnosed with epilepsy by age 80. There are many organizations that help epileptics that sponsored a conference in 1997 called Living Well with Epilepsy I. These include CDC, the American Epilepsy Society (AES), the National Association of Epilepsy Centers (NAEC), and the Epilepsy Foundation (EF).
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Annotated Bibliography - Epilepsy - Nick Buttler 11 March...

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