HURON (WYANDOT) - INTRODUCITON The Huron are important to both United States and Canadian history One version of their tribal name Huron was given to

HURON (WYANDOT) - INTRODUCITON The Huron are important to...

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INTRODUCITON: The Huron are important to both United States and Canadian history. One version of their tribal name, Huron, was given to them by the French and means something close to "rough" or "boorish" (although it is thought to refer to thier bristly hairstyle, not their behavior). Their Native Iroquoian name is Wyandot (or Wendat or Guyandot), meaning "peninsula dwellers" or "islanders." The Huron name, pronounced HYUR-on, generally is used when discussing early Canadian History. Wyandot, also spelled Wyandotte and pronounced WHY-un-dot, is used in reference to the tribal members who relocated to the United States. The Huron had lifeways in common with other Iroquoians classified as NORTHEAST INDIANS. Yet they are not referred to as IROQUOIS (HAUDENOSAUNEE), a name applied to the six tribes of the Iroquois Legaue. The Huron originally lived north of these other tribes in the Lake Simcoe region of Ontario lying between Georgian Bay (part of Lake Huron) and Lake Ontario. In some historical accounts, the Huron homeland is called Huronia. LIFEWAYS: The Huron were divided into various clans, living in different parts of Huronia. These were the Rock Clan, the Cord Clan, the Bear Clan, and the One House Lodge. Like their Iroquois neighbors, the Huron built elm-bark longhouses within walled villages. They typically located their villages on high ground near a navigable river and a clear spring. They cultivated the same crops as the Iroquois, mainly corn, beans, and squash, and sunflowers for food, and tobacco for smoking. They supplemented their diet by hunting, fishing, and gathering wild plant foods. The Huron sometimes drove deer into the rivers or into fenced-in areas, then used bows and arrows to kill them. They often snared beaver in nets. They also snared bears in traps, then fed and fattened them over a period of one or two years before eating them. Tribal members also fished the bay, lakes, and rivers.
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  • History, Huron, Wyandot, Lake Huron

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