Chain of Infection - ChainofInfection Asdescribedabove, agent,host,andenvironment.Morespecifically, aportalofexit,isconveyedb

Chain of Infection - ChainofInfection Asdescribedabove,...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 6 pages.

Chain of Infection As described above, the traditional epidemiologic triad model holds that infectious diseases result from the interaction of  agent, host, and environment. More specifically, transmission occurs when the agent leaves its  reservoir  or host through  portal of exit , is conveyed by some  mode of transmission , and enters through an appropriate  portal of entry  to  infect a  susceptible host . This sequence is sometimes called the chain of infection. Figure 1.19 Chain of Infection Reservoir The reservoir of an infectious agent is the habitat in which the agent normally lives, grows, and multiplies. Reservoirs  include humans, animals, and the environment. The reservoir may or may not be the source from which an agent is  transferred to a host. For example, the reservoir of  Clostridium botulinum  is soil, but the source of most botulism  infections is improperly canned food containing  C. botulinum  spores. Human reservoirs.  Many common infectious diseases have human reservoirs. Diseases that are transmitted from  person to person without intermediaries include the sexually transmitted diseases, measles, mumps, streptococcal  infection, and many respiratory pathogens. Because humans were the only reservoir for the smallpox virus, naturally  occurring smallpox was eradicated after the last human case was identified and isolated.8 Human reservoirs may or may not show the effects of illness. As noted earlier, a carrier is a person with inapparent  infection who is capable of transmitting the pathogen to others. Asymptomatic or passive or healthy carriers are those  who never experience symptoms despite being infected. Incubatory carriers are those who can transmit the agent during  the incubation period before clinical illness begins. Convalescent carriers are those who have recovered from their illness but remain capable of transmitting to others. Chronic carriers are those who continue to harbor a pathogen such as  hepatitis B virus or  Salmonella  Typhi, the causative agent of typhoid fever, for months or even years after their initial  infection. One notorious carrier is Mary Mallon, or Typhoid Mary, who was an asymptomatic chronic carrier  of  Salmonella  Typhi. As a cook in New York City and New Jersey in the early 1900s, she unintentionally infected dozens  of people until she was placed in isolation on an island in the East River, where she died 23 years later.( 45 ) Carriers commonly transmit disease because they do not realize they are infected, and consequently take no special  precautions to prevent transmission. Symptomatic persons who are aware of their illness, on the other hand, may be less
Image of page 1
Image of page 2

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 6 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes