Prisoners of Hate Outline[1]

Prisoners of Hate - CLST311 Prisoners of Hate Outline Part One I II Introduction a The intercommunication system also includes the expectations and

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October 25, 2007 CLST311 Prisoners of Hate Outline: Part One I. Introduction a. The intercommunication system also includes the expectations and demands that people place on themselves and others b. “The tyranny of the shoulds” c. The overgeneralized belief led to an overgeneralized interpretation d. A New Therapy i. Helping patients to modify their cognitions resulted in improvement ii. Cognitive therapy 1. Give the patients more objectivity toward their thoughts and beliefs 2. Albert Ellis iii. “Garden Variety” psychiatric disorders 1. Depression 2. Anxiety 3. Marital problems 4. Addictions 5. Antisocial behavior a. Spouse battering and child abuse b. Criminal Assaults c. Sexual offenses iv. The final common denominator is constant 1. The aggressors have a positive bias regarding themselves and a negative bias toward their adversary, often conceived as the Enemy. v. Sharpening our insights into the cognitive factors can provide some leads in remidiating the personal, interpersonal, and social problems of modern society II. Part 1: The Roots of Hate a. The Prison of Hate i. Technological advances of our era are paralleled by a reversion to the savagery of the Dark Ages 1. Unimaginable horrors of war and wanton annihilation of ethnic religious, and political groups ii. Close relationships crumble under the impact of uncontrolled anger iii. A Personal Experience 1. Irrational behavior leads to hostility 2. Reading other people’s minds is a cruel adaptive mechanism 3. Egocentric monitoring of events is discernible throughout the animal kingdom and is apparently embedded in our genes a. Self protection as well as self promotion is crucial to our survivial
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October 25, 2007 CLST311 iv. The Hostile Frame 1. The overreactions of friends, associates and marital partners to presumed wrongs and offenses are paralleled by the hostile responses of people in confrontation with members of different religious, ethnic, or racial groups 2. “Do the right thing” – would not provide a durable solution 3. Cognitive marital therapy a. Basically, tell each other what you don’t like about one another and then that will decrease the tension 4. Personal system of beliefs defines the conclusions regarding an offender 5. Tyranny of the shoulds a. People must show respect for me at all times b. My spouse should be sensitive to my needs c. People should do what I ask of them v. Of Hate and the Enemy 1. At the peak of a hostile confrontation, individuals see each other as combatants, ready to attack 2. In severe conflicts the adversary may be perceived as ruthless, malicious, and even murderous 3. The sense of vulnerability is generally out of proportion to the adversary’s actual transgression 4. Evolutionary pressures 5. The formula “kill or be killed” defines the problem in simplified, unambiguous terms 6. History is replete with instance in which enmity between families, clans, tribes, ethnic groups, or nations is perpetuated from generation to generation
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course CLST 311 taught by Professor Panos during the Spring '08 term at Towson.

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Prisoners of Hate - CLST311 Prisoners of Hate Outline Part One I II Introduction a The intercommunication system also includes the expectations and

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