Natural Law

Natural Law - Natural Law: Searching for the Perfect...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Natural Law: Searching for the Perfect Justification “Natural law is the condition imposed upon all created things by divine disposition, or instinct of  nature, not by any constitution. For it is not established by man's effort, but by that divine disposition. For  it is the law that nature teaches all animals.                                - Thomas Aquinas HH206 Professor Kurt Beyer 28 October 2005
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Natural Law: Searching for the Perfect Justification Natural law , as well the scientific method was the entire basis of the enlightenment . Newton , Locke, and Bacon all believed that there were unbreakable laws of nature that guided our society and also human nature . While Newton first said that these laws existed , Locke and Bacon furthered his ideas. Locke said that every human is entitled to life and liberty , and that people form communities to gain mutual benefit. Bacon’s four idols intertwined natural law and the scientific method , as he argued that we must unlearn everything and erase all prejudices before learning how the world really works . Later , Adam Smith applied the concepts of natural laws to economics, where he said that an “invisible hand” guided a free marketplace and set market price . Related to these laws of nature , Charles Darwin’s model of evolution theory explains natural selection . He argued that only the most adaptable survived , or that some species were suited better to a given environment than another and in turn their dominant genes were passed on . The notion of a dominant species led to the theory of social Darwinism , where races of people in advanced civilizations actually began to believe that they were superior to those around them . In The Mismeasure of Man , Steven Jay Gould analyzed whether or not natural laws exist in the realm of human intelligence . Among these laws , he examined if certain races have natural intellectual advantages over others , if humans have the ability to measure natural intelligence and quantify it , and if there are traits in the human genome that make for a more intelligent person , possibly leading to intellectual evolution over time . Slagh 2
Background image of page 2
It was Martin Luther that wrote: “There is in man an appetite for the good of his nature as rational , and this is proper to him, for instance, that he should know truths about God and about living in society .” 1 During , the 1800s, scientists wished to quantify which race was intellectually superior , a notion they thought they already knew the answer to . These men wanted to know more about their society and the distinct differences that their creator had instilled in the diverse races
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This essay was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course HH 206 taught by Professor Beyer during the Fall '05 term at Naval Academy.

Page1 / 8

Natural Law - Natural Law: Searching for the Perfect...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online