Medea Title

Medea Title - The Cost of Passion and Taking Action Jason's...

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The Cost of Passion and Taking Action: Jason’s Preparations HE111 Paper 2 LT Feliz 18NOV04
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LT Feliz HE111 18 November 2004 The Cost of Passion and Taking Action: Jason’s Preparations “First say to yourself what you would be; and then do what you have to do.” EPICTETUS Passion can take over a person’s being or inspire one to take action, no matter the cost. Passion is human nature and contributes to our individuality; one of the reasons why the human race is unique is because of the individual desires and wants for their personal lives. Whether or not the end result is desirable, passion has effects that are uncontrollable that were clearly seen in the play Medea. Jason has an unquenchable thirst for power and to see his children rise to power, and he takes actions that might be thought of as cruel in today’s society to achieve his goal; these actions have repercussions. Nevertheless, Jason has a solid plan for securing his family’s fate and takes the steps necessary to bring it to fruition. The first step of Jason’s plan involves identifying a way to reach his personal goal for power in Corinth. He accomplishes this by marrying into royalty, which is the best path to a seat of power, and becoming the ruler someday. Taking the princess as a wife is a great triumph for Jason because even though he is a man of stature, it is more than
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This essay was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course HE 111 taught by Professor Feliz during the Fall '04 term at Naval Academy.

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Medea Title - The Cost of Passion and Taking Action Jason's...

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