lady macbeth

lady macbeth - The Unsexed Lady Macbeth: Manipulation...

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The Unsexed Lady Macbeth: Manipulation through Influence HE 111 Paper 3: Macbeth LT Feliz 30NOV04
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HE 111 Paper 3: Macbeth LT Feliz The Unsexed Lady Macbeth: Manipulation through Influence Men are used as they use others.”                                      -- Bidpai Power: men and women alike crave it. With power, comes happiness—because everything else falls into place once a person has control and influence. But this is not easily achievable because to many people power is like a distant plateau that is a little too far away; this shows why some people are willing to go to excessive measures for the chance to achieve authority. Lady Macbeth delivers a speech in Act I, scene vii that reveals her true character and beliefs; she falls prey to gender roles and believes that killing is a masculine course of action. However, her dominant disposition towards Macbeth allows her to usurp his power and the course of play. For some, murder is a cold-blooded act that can be accomplished by anyone so driven—or perhaps demented—to follow through with it. To Lady Macbeth, the act of killing is masculine and involves a show of manly power. From early on she desires to have the fortitude to do such malicious deeds. “That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, / And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full / Of direst cruelty” (I.v.42-44) Lady Macbeth sets the tone when she talks about being “unsexed”, or becoming a man; to achieve the position of power that she desires, killing will have to be involved. When
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lady macbeth - The Unsexed Lady Macbeth: Manipulation...

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