Project 2 - UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY PROJECT...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY PROJECT TWO: “BOMBS AWAY” SECTION G12 MAJ MCCLUNG BY CADET DANIEL WESTCOTT ‘08, CO G1 MIDSHIPMAN MICHAEL J. SLAGH ‘08, CO G3 WEST POINT, NEW YORK 07 APRIL 2006
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Part I:  The PMF and Simulated Target Destruction We defined D 681  as the number of targets destroyed by an XM-68 bomb in one  month and D 721  as the number of targets destroyed by an XH-72 bomb in one month.  It is  important to note that the XH-72 bombs are more accurate than the XM-68s, yet are more  expensive.  In order to analyze whether it is more cost effective to use certain types of  bombs or more than one bomb, we first needed to define the probability mass function as  well as use our results from the 5000 iterations we conducted of our random variables to  determine the expected values and variance.  The XM-68 has a kill radius of 141 feet, while  the maximum radius of the bomb is 270 feet.  When the ratios of areas are calculated, it is seen that a little over 27% of the time the  bomb will fall in the desired zone.  Because the normal distribution is memoryless and  discrete, each bomb has the same probability on each mission of landing in the target  zone.  Thus, the PMF for D 681  is: x = 1 if the bomb destroys the target and x = 0 otherwise.   Our simulated PMF function came from our 5000 iterations, and it came out to be  very close to our PMF calculations that dealt with the area.  The average number of target hits was 5.446, so out of a  possible 20 hits p(x=1) = .2723.  The expected value is the  Westcott and Slagh, 2 Only those trials with the random variable less than our PMF function were within the radius, and thus deemed successful
Background image of page 2
same as the mean, but in a discrete situation we would need to round down and could  only truly expect to hit 5 targets.  The variance, found through summary statistics of our  5000 iterations, was 3.934 hits.  This is a high relative variance and therefore it is safe to  say that we can expect some considerable dispersion (as many as 14 hits in one trial)  from our expected value when running more iterations.  The percentage of targets  destroyed by bombers is almost exactly the same as the probability of destroying a target 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 9

Project 2 - UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY PROJECT...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online