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11/13/2007 07:38 PM Loading “Document View” Page 1 of 10 Databases selected: National Newspaper Abstracts (3), Research Library Progress Toward Title IX Compliance: The Effect of Formal and Informal Enforcement Mechanisms* Sarah L Stafford . Social Science Quarterly . Austin: Dec 2004. Vol. 85, Iss. 5; pg. 1469, 18 pgs Abstract (Summary) Stafford examines the factors that determine whether an intercollegiate athletic program is in compliance with Title IX, the stature requiring gender equity in educational programs. He concludes that the current enforcement mechanisms have been relatively ineffective at increasing compliance and that some change either in enforcement or compliance method is warranted. Full Text (5872 words) Copyright University of Texas at Austin (University of Texas Press) Dec 2004 [Headnote] Objective. This article examines the factors that determine whether an intercollegiate athletic program is in compliance with Title IX, the statute requiring gender equity in educational programs. Methods. I conduct a series of econometric regressions that examine the compliance status of Division I institutions as well as the progress they have made toward compliance. Results. Large institutions and institutions with a lower percentage of female undergraduates are more likely to be in compliance. Institutions with football programs are less likely to be in compliance as are schools in the south. The effect of football revenues, operating budgets, and NCAA sanctions varies across division as well as compliance area. Conclusions. The results of the analysis indicate that current enforcement mechanisms have been relatively ineffective at increasing compliance and that some change either in enforcement or compliance standards is warranted. Additionally, a one-size-fits-all enforcement approach is unlikely to be effective. Thirty years after the passage of Title IX, the statute requiring gender equity in intercollegiate sports, the majority of colleges and universities are still not in compliance, that is, they do not provide opportunities for participation in intercollegiate sports for male and female students in proportion to their respective undergraduate enrollments. In 2002, Roderick R. Paige, Secretary of the Department of Education in the George W. Bush Administration, formed a Commission on Opportunity in Athletics (COA) to review and debate the issues surrounding Title IX. COA was charged with assessing the current standards for determining compliance and providing recommendations for revisions, if necessary. COA's report, issued in February 2003, calls for clearer guidelines to help schools comply with Title IX and for the Department's Office for Civil Rights (OCR) to enforce current rules more vigorously.1 Before reforming Title IX enforcement, it is important to understand the role that existing enforcement mechanisms
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sm111 3 - Loading "Document View" 11/13/2007...

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