Kezar - 2EWDLQLQJ,QWHJULW\"5HYLHZLQJDQG[DPLQLQJWKH&KDUWHU EHWZHHQ LJKHU(GXFDWLRQDQG6RFLHW Adrianna J Kezar The Review of Higher Education Volume 27

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2EWDLQLQJ ,QWHJULW\" 5HYLHZLQJ DQG ([DPLQLQJ WKH &KDUWHU EHWZHHQ +LJKHU (GXFDWLRQ DQG 6RFLHW\ Adrianna J. Kezar The Review of Higher Education, Volume 27, Number 4, Summer 2004, pp. 429-459 (Article) Published by The Johns Hopkins University Press DOI: 10.1353/rhe.2004.0013 For additional information about this article Access provided by University of Utah (30 Jun 2014 10:37 GMT)
The Review of Higher Education Summer 2004, Volume 27, No. 4, pp. 429–459 Copyright © 2004 Association for the Study of Higher Education All Rights Reserved (ISSN 0162-5748) ADRIANNA KEZAR is Associate Professor at the Rossier School of Education, University of Southern California. Her research interests are in leadership, change and innovation, gover- nance, and diversity. Her most recent book is Taking the Reins of Change through Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2003. Address queries to her at the Higher Education Program, Rossier School of Education, University of Southern California, 3470 Trousdale Pkwy, WPH 703C, Los Angeles, CA 90089-4037; telephone: (213) 821-1519; fax: (213) 740-3889; e-mail: [email protected] Obtaining Integrity? Reviewing and Examining the Charter between Higher Education and Society Adrianna Kezar If we continue to subsume the academic functions of the university into its corporate identity, building institutions for the sake of the institutions them- selves and losing sight of the fact that it is in teaching, research, and scholar- ship that universities make their distinctive social contributions, we will im- poverish the university as an institution and pave the way for the shift of its academic functions into a generic corporate environment. This might be good for business, but it would not be very good for education. (Marginson & Considine, 2000, p. 35) Various social critics and leaders have noted a disturbing trend in higher education: The collective or public good, a historically important compo- nent of the charter between higher education and society, is being compro- mised (Bok, 1982, 1990; Gumport, 2000; Kerr, 1994). Social institutions such as universities and colleges serve long-standing and stable missions for society and have a core set of values to support such a mission (Gumport,
430 T HE R EVIEW OF H IGHER E DUCATION S UMMER 2004 2000). Traditionally higher education’s public role and contribution to the public good has included educating citizens for democratic engagement, supporting local and regional communities, preserving knowledge and making it available to the community, working in concert with other social institutions such as government or health-care agencies to foster their mis- sions, advancing knowledge through research, developing the arts and hu- manities, broadening access to ensure a diverse democracy, developing the intellectual talents of students, and creating leaders for various areas of the public sector (Bok, 1982; Gumport, 2000).

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