April 9 - part seven Ch XVIthe Levin baby \u201cseer of the Fesh,\u201d defamiliarization Chs XVII \u2013 XXII Stiva Ch XX Moscow and Petersburg Chs XXI \u2013 XXII

April 9 - part seven Ch XVIthe Levin baby u201cseer of the...

This preview shows page 1 - 5 out of 13 pages.

part seven Ch XVIthe Levin baby “seer of the flesh,” defamiliarization Chs XVII – XXII Stiva Ch XX Moscow and Petersburg Chs XXI – XXII the spiritual séance at Lydia Ivanovna’s
End of part seven Chs XXIII – XXXI Anna unravels Why, specifically, does she commit suicide? BLACKBOARD: My question is, was Vronsky the cause of her gradual deterioration or was it already building up inside her? We know Anna was unhappy with her marriage, but if Vronsky had never came along to complicate her life would an eventual suicide still have been inevitable? Was there anything more Vronsky could have done to help Anna's intruding thoughts, or was it mostly Anna against herself? Is Anna a victim of circumstance or might she be the cause of her own misery? It seems that Tolstoy is saying that there is no happy ending for a woman who was adulterous in his era and the only way out was through death. Viktor Shklovsky (“defamiliarization” guy)
The real anna Anna Stepanovna Pirogova (January 1872) living with Tolstoy’s neighboring landlord, Bibikov, a widower Bibikov children’s German governess
Novels of adultery often have a tragic ending.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture