{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Honors_Af_Am_Lit_Syllabus_Fall_2007

Honors_Af_Am_Lit_Syllabus_Fall_2007 - AML 2600:006-Honors...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
AML 2600:006-Honors Introduction to African American Literature and the African American Literary Tradition FALL 2007 T/R 11:00-12:15 (Williams 114) Dr. Robert J. Patterson Office Hours: Williams 445/850-645-6863 Wednesdays 10-12:30 Email: [email protected] & by Appointment “In the history of the world’s great literatures, few traditions have origins as curious as that created by African slaves and ex-slaves writing in the English language in the third quarter of the eighteenth century. In the stubbornly durable history of human slavery, it was only the black slaves in England and the United States who created a genre of literature that, at once, testified against their captors and bore witness to the urge to be free and literate, to embrace the European Enlightenment’s dream of reason and American Enlightenment’s dream of civil liberty, wedded together gloriously in a great republic of letters.” --Henry Louis Gates Jr and Nellie Y. McKay “The history of African American literary criticism from the Harlem Renaissance to contemporary feminist theory clearly demonstrates that theory and sociopolitical criticism have seldom failed to interact in some manner, whether constructive, controversial, or volatile.” --Angelyn Mitchell "Narrative has never been merely entertainment for me. It is, I believe, one of the principal ways in which we absorb knowledge." --Toni Morrison Course Description: The purpose of this honors seminar is to introduce students to some of the seminal texts and authors that shape the field of African American literary studies. Through fiction, drama, autobiography, poetry, short stories, spirituals, critical essays, and literary criticism, we will explore formal and thematic concerns that simultaneously unite and disjoin African American literature and the African American literary tradition. To that end, we will interrogate the ways in which the literary texts engage historical events (slavery, Reconstruction, WWI, WW II, the Civil Rights movement), legal events (segregation and integration) and activist events (the women's liberation movements, gay and lesbian rights movements, and the black feminist movements), and social practices (racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia), while also considering the emergence, re-emergence, and reconfigurations of ideologies, themes, concepts, and formal techniques within African American literature and the literary tradition. While previous familiarity with African American literature is not a requirement for this course, regular attendance and a firm commitment to succeed are! Course Objectives: By the end of the semester, each student will be able to discuss several aspects of African American literature including, but not confined to, the following: At least a dozen writers, critics, and texts that are generally included in the African American literary canon/tradition.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The differences and similarities between and among African American writers of various eras, genders, classes, and political stances.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern