aml2600

aml2600 - 1291 Words Joseph Henry AML2600 Dr. Patterson...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Joseph Henry AML2600 Dr. Patterson October 25, 2007 The Hurricane: Stirring Up Racial Tensions in Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God and Richard Wright’s “Down by the Riverside” Two hurricanes ravaged not only the land, but also the lives of the main characters in both Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God and Richard Wright’s “Down by the Riverside.” Unwilling or unable to leave, both Hurston’s Janie and Tea Cake and Wright’s Mann brave their respective storms, and are left to deal with the consequences when their hurricanes subside. As bodies and debris rise to the surface, so, too do racial tensions, as the time of disaster forces blacks and whites to interact in ways that they have not had to before. Coincidentally, both Hurston’s Janie and Tea Cake and Wright’s Mann describe strikingly similar events and occurrences, including the storm’s magnitude and devastation and the forced enlistment to assist in relief efforts. Through these events and the devices each author employs to depict them that the severity of the racial prejudice already prevalent is made known. Indeed, both Wright’s and Hurston’s portrayal of their characters’ experiences with failure to flee, the storm itself, and involuntary conscription reveal how the storm so chronically exacerbates racial tensions and injustices. Mann’s and Janie’s motives for not fleeing the inclement storm reveal their state of poverty, a plight of many African-Americans in their time. Wright’s employment of the third- 1291 Words
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
person omniscient voice as Mann ponders his failure to leave allows the reader to judge Mann’s reasoning both as an outsider and as one informed of his thought process. Mann reveals that he had in fact been offered a boat, but turned it down in favor of a head-start for plowing once the storm has blown over. Realizing the storm was more severe than he thought, Mann further states that he is unable to escape now, since he cannot afford a boat. This recalling of Mann’s thoughts
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course AML 2600 taught by Professor Patterson during the Fall '07 term at FSU.

Page1 / 5

aml2600 - 1291 Words Joseph Henry AML2600 Dr. Patterson...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online