General Anxiety Disorder - GAD and OCD 1 Ben Roiger...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
GAD and OCD Ben Roiger Abnormal Psychology Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder; A Comparison. 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
GAD and OCD Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder; A Comparison. To begin, I am going to give the definitions of the two disorders which I am going to compare and contrast. The first, in which I will cover, is called General Anxiety Disorder (GAD). It is defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-4) of which an individual is characterized as having 6 months of persistent anxiety and worry. (DSM-4, 2000). Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is stated in the DSM-4 as an individual having recurrent intrusive thoughts, but the thoughts are experienced as being inappropriate and are not related to an experienced traumatic event. In OCD the individual knows their actions are excessive and often times unreasonable. (DSM-4, 2000) In General Anxiety Disorder, as the name suggests, the main feature is a chronic state of diffuse anxiety. The syndrome is defined as excessive worry over a period of six months over various life circumstances such as family, work, money and health. People normally worry about such things but it is the excessiveness and uncontrollability of the worrying that makes it a disorder. People with this disorder are continually waiting for 2
Background image of page 2
GAD and OCD something dreadful to happen either to themselves or to those they care about and this subjective condition spills over onto their cognitive and physiological functioning. They are restless and irritable, their hearts beat faster, they have difficulty concentrating and they tire. They can also suffer from chronic muscle tension or insomnia. (DSM-4, 2000) In response to these symptoms, many people can develop a secondary anxiety that is an anxiety about their anxiety, fearing that their condition will cause them to develop further social and physical health problems such as losing their job or developing ulcers. The panic disorder GAD usually comes in the wake of OCD.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course PSYCH 200 taught by Professor Sifers during the Spring '08 term at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Page1 / 7

General Anxiety Disorder - GAD and OCD 1 Ben Roiger...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online