notesbatch2 - Country & Folk Music Country Music Atlanta,...

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Country Music Atlanta, Georgia 1922: first country music radio broadcast Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family both made their first records in Bristol, Tennessee on August 4, 1927. The Carters would be the preservers of the tradition, Jimmie Rodgers would be the great innovator. The Carter Family The Carter Family EXAMPLE: “Wildwood Flower" (1928) The Carter Family Traditional features include: 1)The song itself (it had existed for generations) 2)The vocal quality--nasal, unadorned, no vibrato, straightforward rendition of the melody. 3) No drums, horns, riffs or other influences from pop or jazz. But, the texture is different from "Old Joe Clark." The banjo is gone, as is the fiddle. Jimmie Rodgers EXAMPLE: "Waiting for a Train" Jimmie Rodgers Mixes in the sound of the steel guitar and a small jazz band: cornet, clarinet and string bass. Thus, the song represents a mixture of country, blues and New Orleans style jazz. White Reinterpretation of African-American Musical Style Jimmie Rodgers also recorded a series of songs he called "Blue Yodels." They are blues in form, feeling and style, and represent a white take on black music much in the way that Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis also do. Jimmie Rodgers Blue Yodel Blues progression Country inflections in the vocal (including the yodel) Western Swing Bob Wills- one of many to be influenced by Jimmie Rodgers. Southwest = avant-garde of country music. Wills's "Steel Guitar Rag" exemplifies Southwestern openness to outside influences in country: mixes a rhythm section and horns from jazz with the steel guitar.
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Honky-Tonk EXAMPLE: Hank Williams Sr. "Your Cheatin' Heart” 1) Lyrics in plain language delivered with intense emotion (almost blues-like) 2) Instrumental accompaniment features fiddle and steel guitar (from country) plus 3) Non-country infusions from a rhythm section (string bass, guitar and drums) to give rhythmic and harmonic support. Precedes Rockabilly Country Swing and Honky-tonk brought popular music a step away from rock and roll. Bill Haley, Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins and others would take the next step. Folk Music Alan and John Lomax, Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger were at the core of the folk revival. In 1933, with support from the Library of Congress, John and Alan Lomax began recording Southern folk singers and published songbooks of their transcribed recordings. Folk Legends Woody Guthrie: major influence on Bob Dylan. “This Land Is Your Land” Pete Seeger: sang “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” with The Weavers. Black Gospel Music White Protestant hymnody+ African-American spiritual+blues+fervent emotional expression Thomas A. Dorsey is regarded as the father of Black Gospel (We heard him as Georgia Tom, one of the Hokum Brothers on “It’s Tight Like That.”) Black Gospel Songs Black gospel music was confined to African-American churches and conventions along a route known as the Gospel Highway.
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Featured either a male quartet or female solo singers. The Male Quartet
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course MUS 307 taught by Professor Heflin during the Spring '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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notesbatch2 - Country & Folk Music Country Music Atlanta,...

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