3 Presentation Part 4-5 Child and Infant CPR

3 Presentation Part 4-5 Child and Infant CPR - CPR for...

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CPR for Children Chapter 4 in Book Watch video CPR for Children Pages 29-31 in book
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CPR for Children CPR for the child is for children between the ages of 1 and puberty (around 8) Once a child reaches puberty you should use the CPR for adult guidelines Make sure you have completed the lesson on CPR for adults before this one.
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How do I know if a child is in puberty? Once a child reaches puberty you will see signs of breast development and underarm hair growth for the girls and boy will start to have facial hair
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Differences between CPR for Adult and Child Amount of air for breaths Possibly need to try more than twice to deliver 2 breaths that make the chest rise Depth compression May use 1 or 2-hand compressions for very small children What to do when the child’s pulse is less than 60 beats a minute When to attach an AED When to activate the emergency response team If you witness collapse contact EMS immediately. If you do not witness and find the child provide 2 minutes of CPR if alone then go call 911. 2 rescuer ratio of compression to breaths is 15:2
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Amount of Air Be careful when giving breaths to a child that you only give enough air to make the chest rise. Smaller children will require less air then a larger one.
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Amount of Breaths You may need to try a couple of times to give a total of 2 breaths to make the victims chest rise. If neither breath gets the chest to rise re-open the airway by repositioning the head and try again You must give effective breaths to children during CPR as often their heart will be still pumping while they are not breathing.
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Depth of Compressions When compressing a child's chest you should compress down a compression depth of at least one third of the anterior-posterior chest diameter or approximately 2 inches
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1 Handed Chest Compressions For very small children you may want to use either 1 or 2 hands for chest compressions.
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CPR for Low Heart Rate If the child's heart rate is less than 60 beats per minute with signs of poor perfusion (they have poor color) you should start CPR To check the heart rate check the pulse for 10 seconds and multiply by 6 to get a rate for a minute. Remember if you witness the collapse you leave and go call 911 if you are alone. If you find the child and did not see the collapse you would do 2 minutes of CPR then go call 911
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Activating EMS If you find a child unresponsive and you are by your self you should provide about 5 cycles of CPR before you leave the child alone to activate the Emergency Response System If a child collapses suddenly in your presence go get an call 911 and go get an AED if available then begin CPR.
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Children Complete Sequence The following slides will outline the complete sequence for administrating CPR to a child
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