kojiko - EALC 1011 March 2008 Yamato Takeru: The Human...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
EALC 1011 March 2008 Yamato Takeru: The Human Virtues of a Warrior The story of Yamato Takeru in Kojiki is significant in its depiction of the warrior ideals before and during 8 th century Japanese culture. Kojiki was compiled in 712 CE and it contains the account of Yamato the Brave as an idiosyncratic tragic hero. Much of his character is exaggerated, from his willingness to single handedly pacify his father's kingdom to his superhuman ability in subduing deities. The extraordinary elements of Yamato Takeru's tale cannot be construed as historical, however the the more human aspects of his personality lends the story to suggest that Yamato Takeru acted as people were thought best to act. Even though Yamato Takeru is a descendant from gods his feats represent a character that is more a human than a deity. This fact is illustrated in both the treatment of his heroic abilities as well as his more plausible human emotions and cunning wit. As a heroic figure his likeness is similar to the Greek Hercules or the Biblical Samson. Yamato Takeru was born to the imperial family and was therefore a descendant of Amaterasu, the Great Heaven Shining Goddess (Kojiki,
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This essay was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course EALC 1011 taught by Professor Kleeman,te during the Spring '08 term at Colorado.

Page1 / 3

kojiko - EALC 1011 March 2008 Yamato Takeru: The Human...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online