WW1 Nationalism MIDTERM1

WW1 Nationalism - History 4020 The Legacies of Wilson and Lenin Unrealized Rhetoric By 1918 the creation of new nation states in Europe promulgated

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History 4020 The Legacies of Wilson and Lenin: Unrealized Rhetoric By 1918 the creation of new nation states in Europe promulgated the rising popularity of national self-determinism as prescribed by U.S. President Woodrow Wilson. Wilson outlined the assurance of international peace through a new world order made of cooperation between nations, comprised of ethnic identities, thereby translating the fervor of nationalism that had driven the world to war into a constructive global society and system of international relations. (Dawley) V.I. Lenin, the leader of the Bolsheviks and Russia's preeminent leader following the Russian revolution of 1917, also sought a new world order based principally upon national self- determinism. Yet, in determining peace in the post-war global order, neither Wilson's nor Lenin's ideas held much veracity as imperial domination from the Great Powers continued. Lenin's militant and anarchic solution to imperial world order terrified the Great Powers and alienated his cause. Russia was intentionally excluded from the negotiation table at Versailles, where France and Britain could defend their colonial holdings and preserve old world imperialism at the expense of Wilsonian ideals.(source somebody) At the end of the First World War Wilson's and Lenin's approaches to self determination both failed to restructure national identities into effective societies. Not only did the old world order of imperialism and colonialism remain extant, but the supposedly new societies influenced by Wilsonian and Leninist principles lacked substantial change that reflected any progressive internationalism. The ideas of Wilson and Lenin that promoted nationalism and self-determination as a pathway for peace were compounded by the inherent belief in moral superiority and absolute rightness of the cause. The Americans had entered the war to protect preexisting economic trade links to the Allies, yet the obsession with redeeming Europe and promoting a new democratic
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societies galvanized domestic support for the war. Dawley describes this nationalism as a myth of Messianic America or a Manichean mentality of Good-versus-Evil that appealed to Americans' religious and moral sensibilities (Dawley, 145). Lenin and the Bolsheviks also positioned the movement upon the infallible opinion that liberating people and toppling
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course HIST 4020 taught by Professor Bruce during the Spring '07 term at Colorado.

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WW1 Nationalism - History 4020 The Legacies of Wilson and Lenin Unrealized Rhetoric By 1918 the creation of new nation states in Europe promulgated

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