Kafka and related Concepts

Kafka and related Concepts - 10/31/07 Franz Kafka,...

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10/31/07 Global Narratives Kafka 1 Franz Kafka, 1883-1924 German-speaking, non-practicing Jew, living in Czechoslovakia Albert Einsten returned one of Kafka’s books to Thomas Mann with the statement: “I couldn’t read it, the human mind isn’t complicated enough” Albert Camus: “The whole of Kafka’s art consists in compelling the reader to reread him.” Other Critics on Kafka: “When a person performs something that is quite commonplace, it becomes, under the eye of the discerning, bizarre; for the person who committed the action was unconscious of its symbolic significance … He discovers the hidden relationship between the smallest and the greatest facts and phenomena … Whatever Kafka describes acquires its own special proportions which render even daily matters somewhat absurd and make them, at the same time, new and interesting.” Gertrude Urzidil “They [Kafka’s characters] are not persons whom we could meet in a real world, for they lack all the many superfluous detailed characteristics which together make a real
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course LIT 80X taught by Professor Cooppan during the Fall '07 term at UCSC.

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Kafka and related Concepts - 10/31/07 Franz Kafka,...

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