Hypothesis/Null-Hypothesis

Hypothesis/Null-Hypothesis - around in the area (again...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Jennifer Oncay ENVS 24 – Section November 01, 2007 Hypothesis/Null-hypothesis Assignment During my walk, I noticed a certain phenomena involving eucalyptus trees. As I compared with other trees, the eucalyptus tree tended to not have as many insects in the area. Why is this so? From being in the trees’ presence, I took note of a particular smell I found only on eucalyptus. Imagining myself as an insect, I presumed that the somewhat potent smell of the eucalyptus for me as a human is not nearly as strong as it is for an insect. Therefore, I deduced that due to the odorous eucalyptus trees, insects are deterred from this type of tree. To test such a hypothesis is simple. There are extracts for certain types of trees. Take a eucalyptus sample, which in this case could be a branch or even bought eucalyptus oil. Find other samples of trees
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: around in the area (again either branches or oils). Keep the samples in the same area but separated from each other in order to prevent any mix ups among smells for the insects. Near each sample place a small dab of peanut butter. Observe each sample and see which dab of peanut butter attracts more insects. This test will show which leaves attract more or less amounts of insects depending on the scents given off of the leaves. A possible null hypothesis is that the smell of the leaves has nothing to do with attraction or deterring of insects. The trees could in general not possess the necessary resources for insects to consider a comfortable niche. The reason why eucalyptus trees tend to drive insects away could be of other factors that are not related to scent but maybe even taste....
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online