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Sci Eng Ethics (2018) 24:821–8301 3EDITORIALEmerging ICT for Citizens’ Veillance: Theoreticaland Practical InsightsPhilip Boucher1 · Susana Nascimento2 · Mariachiara Tallacchini3Received: 22 February 2018 / Accepted: 23 February 2018 / Published online: 28 February 2018© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018AbstractIn ubiquitous surveillance societies, individuals are subjected to obser-vation and control by authorities, institutions, and corporations. Sometimes, citizenscontribute their own knowledge and other resources to their own surveillance. Inaddition, some of “the watched” observe “the watchers” “through” sous‐veillantactivities, and various forms of self-surveillance for different purposes. However,information and communication technologies are also increasingly used for socialinitiatives with a bottom up structure where citizens themselves deff ne the goals,shape the outcomes and proff t from the beneff ts of watching activities. This model,which we deff ne ascitizens’ veillanceand explore in this special issue, may pre-sent opportunities for individuals and collectives to be more prepared to meet thechallenges they face in various domains including environment, health, planning andemergency response.KeywordsSurveillance · Citizens’ veillance · Emerging ICT*Philip Boucher[email protected]Susana Nascimento[email protected]Mariachiara Tallacchini[email protected]1European Parliament - European Parliamentary Research Service, Brussels, Belgium2European Commission - Joint Research Centre (JRC), Brussels, Belgium3Facoltà di Economia e Giurisprudenza, Università Cattolica S.C., Piacenza, Italy
822P. Boucher et al.1 3Introduction: Towards Citizens’ VeillanceIn ubiquitous surveillance societies, individuals are subjected to observation andcontrol by authorities, institutions, and corporations. Sometimes, we observe citi-zens contributing their own knowledge and other resources to their own surveil-lance. We also see some of ‘the watched’ observing ‘the watchers’ through sous‐veillant activities, and various forms of self-surveillance for different purposes(Lyon2007). However, information and communication technologies (ICT) arealso increasingly used for social initiatives with a bottom up structure where citi-zens themselves deff ne the goals, shape the outcomes and proff t from the beneff tsof watching activities. This model, which we deff ne ascitizens’ veillance, maypresent opportunities for individuals and collectives to be more prepared to meetthe challenges they face in various domains including environment, health, plan-ning and emergency response.Here, we use this concept of citizens’ veillance to explore a set of activitiesperformed by citizens—often under the banner of citizen science (CS) and peercollaborative knowledge—with the broad and primary aim of producing knowl-edge that is socially useful and empowering, in contrast with other watching activ-ities that are mobilised as a means of control. We understand citizens’ veillanceas a condition in which citizens’ cognitive alertness and knowledge production isproactively oriented towards the protection of shared goods. Our reasons to adoptthe term veillance relate to the elimination of the locations and directions of theinquisitive “gaze”—the ‘sur-’, ‘sous-’ and ‘self-’—toward a broader “becoming

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Tanmoy

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