project #3 - Second Draft WRT 105-01 Project#3 Synthesis In...

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Second Draft WRT 105-01 Project #3: Synthesis In 1963, psychologist Stanley Milgram conducted an experiment designed to force the subject to either obey an authority against their moral conscience, or to disobey. The experiment consisted of a subject who was instructed by an experimenter to shock another human with varying levels of electricity. The subject was not aware that the human being shocked was an actor, and was actually not being shocked at all. The purpose was to see how obedient and submissive people would be towards an authority (the experimenter) when they are asked to do something that is clearly against moral principals. The voltage increases from 15 to 450 volts, at which point the individual being shocked has already screamed in pain, complained of a heart condition, and eventually gone silent. Despite these obvious signs that the individual is in serious pain and most likely in danger of heart failure, about 60% of the subjects are fully obedient and finish the experiment at the highest voltage. The subjects were obviously conflicted, not wanting to inflict pain or injury on the individual but still chose to obey the insistent demands of the experimenter.
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  • Spring '08
  • O'Grady
  • Stanford prison experiment, psychologist Stanley Milgram, destructive process, obviously malicious intentions

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