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Paper 1 - LAST NAME Working Memory 5623272565 Jeff L.,...

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LAST NAME Working Memory 5623272565 Jeff L., Fridays at 12:00 Involvement of Working Memory on Recall Tests Hannah Bayer Psych 100, Spring 2006 Discussion Section Friday, 1:00
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LAST NAME Working Memory 5623272565 Jeff L., Fridays at 12:00 Purpose This study is meant to provide insight into human working (or short-term) memory. Participants were read a list of 30 words and then asked to write all of the words they could remember at the end. They were then read another list of 20 words and asked to identify which words they had heard in the first list and those which they had not. I hypothesize that the subjects will be likely to think that a word had been on the previous list if the word is either associable or rhymes with a word that actually was on the previous list. For example, since “table,” “sit,” “legs,” and “seat,” were read on the first list of Condition I, subjects will falsely recall that “chair” was as well. Since the word “tough” was on the first list, subjects will think that the word “rough” was as well. Condition II’s first list of 30 words has more words similar to the words on the second list, so the subjects in Condition II will likely judge more accurately which words from the second list of 20 words were on the initial list of 30 words as well. The words from the second list that the subjects of Condition II would be likely to associate with those on the first list are actually on the first list, meaning that it is likely that those in Condition II will recall more correctly whether or not the words on the second list of 20 words were on the first list of 30 words as well. It is also my prediction that a high number of the subjects will remember the words read in the first part of the list, forget many of the words in the middle, and many of the participants will remember the words at the last part of they list, due to the “serial position effect” (Mynatt & Doherty, 2002, p.166). This effect is comprised of the “primacy effect – words early in the list are recalled at a high level – and a powerful recency effect – words late in the list are recalled at a high level” (Mynatt & Doherty, 2002, p. 166). I predict that the
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LAST NAME Working Memory 5623272565 Jeff L., Fridays at 12:00 combination of these two effects will lead to a higher percentage of the words in the beginning of the list of 30 words to be remembered, the middle portion of the words forgotten more on average, and the last section of words remembered on a higher average. Methods Participants I recruited my participants by asking people who lived on my dormitory floor to help me with my psychology study, which many were willing to do. I got a fairly equal balance in gender participants. I also enlisted the help of my family in order to get some age variation. My participants for Condition I are as follows: Male, 18 years old; Male, 19 years old;
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This note was uploaded on 10/13/2007 for the course PSYC 100 taught by Professor Madigan during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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Paper 1 - LAST NAME Working Memory 5623272565 Jeff L.,...

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