Aff-Blocks - AFF BLOCKS AGAINST EDUCATION Practcally...

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AFF BLOCKS AGAINST EDUCATION Practically everyone, even those who are uninterested in politics, has a general idea of what party advocates what. Even if these ideas are widely exaggerated and stereotypical, most everyone has at least an idea of what's going on in America's political sphere. So, when people do cast a vote, they have some sort of basis for their decision. Whether that basis is the result of a political science degree from Harvard or the result of an advertisement they just saw on TV, it's not our job to decide if the reasons for their decision are "correct" or not. What matters is that they have an opinion, and, because they live in a democracy, they should express it. It's not our place to decide if that opinion is well-founded or not. (Which means that just 'cause elections can end up controlled by demagoguery and advertisements, that doesn't necessarily mean that those elections are invalid.) Edwina Throsby, the Australian Editorial Director of TEDxSydney writes for the Australian counterpart to ABC news: "Quite often, the undecided voters in my groups had their facts skewed, confused, or just wrong. But at the same time, many were able to articulate a set of opinions, desires and criticisms that they were applying to their decision of who to vote for, even if they were a little blurry about the detail. Which begs the question, how much political information do you actually need to be able to vote? It's unrealistic to expect that every Australian has the same level of interest in politics [as the politically aware.] as readers of The Drum . The 20th century economist Anthony Downs built an argument that becoming very highly politically informed is actually a waste of effort, because an effective vote can be made on relatively scant information. Political scientists have since observed that we form informational shortcuts, in which gut decisions are made from simple messages. Or that paying only passing, sporadic attention to political news or debate can still result in a citizen casting a vote that genuinely reflects his or her attitudes and ideologies." This is also true in America--the 60% that currently vote aren't necessarily the most politically aware citizens in the country, either. Many just vote with general ideas for what each candidate stands for. But, even so, their opinions are valued just as much as the opinions of those who are extremely politically aware. And, honestly, that's what democracy means. That's what's MOST important in upholding

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