Seperation Lab - SeparationLab Materials...

Info icon This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Separation Lab Materials ● 1 Graduated Cylinder ● 2 Crucible Tongs ● 1 Magnet in a plastic bag ● 2 Aluminum cups ● 1 Sifter/Sieve ● 2 Plastic Cups ● 1 Forcep/Tweezer ● 1 Electronic Balance ● 2 Square sheets of aluminum foil ● 1 White cup with iron, sand, salt and wood shavings ● 2 Insulator pads ● 1 Stirring Rod ● 1 Heating Plate ● 1 red sharpie Procedures Separate In the experiment, we had a cup with 4 different substances­iron, sand, salt, and wood shavings­ mixed together. In order to find the mass, we had to separate the materials. First, we used a magnet inside a plastic bag to get out all of the iron in the cup. We put all the iron that we brought out into a plastic cup. We used a tweezer to get out all the wood shavings and we put that into another plastic cup. Lastly, to separate the sand and salt, we put water into the mix and heated it with a heating pad in order to dissolve the salt and get the sand alone. Mass We used an electronic balance in order to figure out the mass of each of the materials. After separating the materials into their own individual cups, we placed each material with the cup one at a time on the electronic balance. We also measured the mass of the different cups using the electric balance. Then we subtracted the mass of each type of cup from the mass of the material with the cup, to find the mass of the material by itself. Variables, Controls, and Constant Independent Variable: ​ Iron, Sand, Salt and Wood Shaving Dependent Variable: ​ Mass Control: ​ Mass of cup with all materials in it Constant:​ Electronic Balance Data Tables Total Mass Material Mass (g) White cup and substances 10.69 Plastic cup with wood 5.067 Plastic cup with iron shavings 5.546 Aluminum cup with sand 8.268 Cups Materials Mass (g) Plastic Container 4.647 White Cup 2.842 Aluminum Cup 1.546 total mass ­ cup mass = substance ​ Substances Materials Mass (g) All the substances together 7.848 Wood shavings .4200 Iron .8990 Sand 6.722 Salt .1840 Process of Separation Material Separation Process Iron P magnetism Wood P filtration with tweezers Sand P evaporation(distillation) Salt P dissolving Key P= Physical C= Chemical Percent Composition To calculate the percent composition of each component, we used our mass of each component and the entire sample. We entered it into formula for percent composition which is |component (g) | |.8990 | | entire sample | x 100. The percent composition for iron is | 7.848| x 100 = 11.46%. The percent | composition for wood shavings is ||.4200 7.848| x 100 = 5.352%. The percent composition for sand is | |.1840 | ||6.722 7.848| x 100 = 85.65%. The percent composition for salt is | 7.848| x 100 = 2.345%. Total amount percent composition is 104.8%. The total percent composition is greater than 100%. Conclusion The objective of this lab was to separate different substances in order to figure out the mass of each individual substance. We used a quantitative type of data because quantitative means data that can be measured and deals with numbers. In the lab we measured the mass; the mass deals with numbers and measurement. During this lab we had some difficulties in getting thesand and salt separate in order to get the mass of each substance. We dissolved the salt in water and threw the dissolved salt into the sink. So in order to get the mass of the salt we had to get the mass of the other substances. We had to find the sand mass then add it to the iron and wood masses. After that, we subtracted the mass of iron, sand, and wood shavings­ without the cups­ from the total mass of all the substances together­without the white cup­ in order to find the mass of the salt. Another difficulty that we had is that we realized that we did not completely dry out the sand, since it was still moist because water was still left in it. Because of this, our mass of the sand was a lot bigger and out of proportion, making our percent composition greater than one hundred percent. ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern