Hubristic Pride Equals Self-Destruction - John Doe English 115-Online Spring 2015 Essay#1 Hubristic Pride Equals Self-Destruction In Jack Londons story

Hubristic Pride Equals Self-Destruction - John Doe English...

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John Doe September 18, 2015 English 115-Online Spring 2015 Essay #1 Hubristic Pride Equals Self-Destruction In Jack London’s story “To Build a Fire,” the narrative suggests that the story emphasizes knowledge as useful for survival under harsh weather conditions. However, a closer look at some key points stated by the narrator, such as the un-named main character being a newcomer to the land, and ignoring warnings from an old timer, demonstrate the story is about hubris. The un-named protagonist, who the narrator calls “the man,” is overconfident and conceited. The man is a newcomer to the Yukon, and has never traversed the land. Despite his newness to the land, he voluntarily chooses to take a different route from his boys, so he can check out the possibilities of getting logs next spring. “He was a newcomer to the land, a chechaquo, and this was his first winter. The trouble with him was that he was without imagination. He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only the things, and not in the significance” (110). This clearly shows his exaggerated pride and reckless thinking. His mind is on the potential money he can make in the spring, rather then the immediate danger of the harsh climate during the winter. He is overconfident of his alertness, and quickness. When the third person omniscient narrator

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