Diminishing Reciprocal Fairness by Disrupting the right DLPFC

Diminishing Reciprocal Fairness by Disrupting the right DLPFC

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The Neural Basis of Economic Decision-Making in the Ultimatum Game Diminishing Reciprocal Fairness by Disrupting the Right Prefrontal Cortex Reaction Paper Tuhin Chakraborty This pair of articles was particularly interesting because they both talked about the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and both came up with seemingly opposite experimental results about its function with regards to the Ultimatum Game. Upon closer review, however, I found that the two papers were less contradictory than I had originally imagined. It is important to note that the earlier paper, written in 2003, focused more on the bilateral anterior insula, though it found that the DLPFC and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), were also activated during the Ultimatum Game. Their results showed their hypothesis to be correct, in that there was a correlation between stronger anterior insula activation and a higher proportion of rejected offers. But as the paper continued to describe why they thought the DLPFC activation did not correlate with acceptance rates, I made the major distinction between the two papers. This paper ran a statistical test
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This essay was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course NEUROBIO 95 taught by Professor Platt during the Spring '08 term at Duke.

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