Frames, Biases, and Rational Decision-Making in the Human Brain

Frames, Biases, and Rational Decision-Making in the Human Brain

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Frames, Biases, and Rational Decision-Making in the Human Brain Behavioural Studies of Strategic Thinking in Games Reaction Paper Tuhin Chakraborty The article about frames, biases, and rational decision making was an interesting article, relating activation in emotional or rational centers of the brain to the way a decision is presented to the subject. In reviewing the experiment, I decided for myself that I would have chosen in accordance with the frame effect. After learning that you have just received $50, keeping $20 of it seems like a great idea instead of risking it. On the other hand, in the Loss frame I felt that since I was losing $30 dollars anyway, I might as well gamble it and see if I got lucky. As it says in the article, the frames were expressed with different probabilities and starting amounts, and this probably would have factored into my decision, but it was interesting to note that these differences did not effect the outcomes of the experiment. Another point that caught my eye was that if a subject did not react to the frame effect, the writers dubbed this a 'decision [that] ran counter to their general behavioral tendency'. So why is it that
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online