Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics

Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics - Calvin Hayashi Professor S...

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Unformatted text preview: Calvin Hayashi Professor S. Córdova 9/9/2006 Relations In his “Nicomachean Ethics,” Aristotle discusses the notion that all activities that people do aim at some end, and that end is a good. He says that this good of being human is called happiness, and it is an end to itself. This happiness is reached through many different kinds of virtues, but the most important one is contemplative wisdom, which is the “being-at-work of the intellect,” as Aristotle calls it. The problem that Aristotle deals with is getting to contemplative wisdom. How do friendship and the moral virtues, especially justice, relate to the best and most complete virtue? Aristotle’s text deals with this question by telling us that the moral virtues, justice, and friendship relate to the best and most complete virtue, or contemplative wisdom, because knowledge of friendship, justice, and the moral virtues leads one to contemplative wisdom, and accordingly happiness. In chapters eight and nine, Aristotle discusses friendship. According to Aristotle, friendship is “that between people who are good and are alike in virtue since they wish for good things for one another in the same way insofar as they are good”(1156b 7-9). In this quote he explains how one way of how relationships work, which in this case is the relationship of friends. They work by telling people that in order to have a relationship as friends, they need to wish, or want good things for each other. This wishing leads to Aristotle’s next statement that “it is necessary for the happy person to have friends” (1169b 23-24). necessary for the happy person to have friends” (1169b 23-24)....
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This essay was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course ETHICS 240 taught by Professor Cordova during the Fall '06 term at University of San Francisco.

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Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics - Calvin Hayashi Professor S...

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