Final.Lysistrata

Final.Lysistrata - Stefan Seltz-Axmacher 4/22/2008 ENG...

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Stefan Seltz-Axmacher 5/11/2009 ENG 105-H Schools Need Alotta Lysistrata The play Lysistrata, by Aristophanes, is a vivid story where the women of Athens deny sex to their husbands in order to pressure them into peace. The mature content of Lysistrata has made it the subject of heated debate since it’s first penning in 411 B.C. It is thoroughly argued that Lysistrata should not be taught in schools because of the pretension that it might be too mature for even the oldest of students. Lysistrata should be taught in schools because of the emotional maturity of older high school students, Lysistrata ’s value as a classic, and the important lessons that Lysistrata teaches. Lysistrata should be taught to our students when they can appreciate it. The main argument against the teaching of Lysistrata in schools is the feeling that students are not mature enough to appreciate the work, and read about men with out-of- this-world erections (Virgil v. School Board of Columbia County, Florida, 17), (Aristophanes 92). The famous Virgil case, a Supreme Court case in 1989, dealt specifically with the banning of Lysistrata from being taught to seniors in high school. The court found that “school officials can “take into account the emotional maturity of the intended audience in determining…[the appropriateness of] potentially sensitive topics’ such as sex…” (Virgil v. School Board of Columbia County Florida 17). While this decision makes sense on its own, the schools deeming of Lysistrata as inappropriate
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Final.Lysistrata - Stefan Seltz-Axmacher 4/22/2008 ENG...

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