Lispector response philosophy and literature

Lispector response philosophy and literature - Stone Allen...

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Stone Allen Washington Professor Brandhorst Philosophy and Literature 18 April 2016 Lispector Response In the novel, The Passion According to G.H , by Clarice Lispector, the book is centered around a woman known as G.H, a wealthy Brazilian woman living in a penthouse in Rio de Janeiro. She is described as being very rich and social, but her many friends seem to associate as merely acquaintances, along with her lover. Being very rich she spends much of her time pursuing her hobby of sculpting at her leisure. Her favorite task is to arrange and organize various objects. Despite this she is described as being disordered, disillusioned, and disorganized. She feels stuck between getting lost in the exciting possibilities of life, which she fears, and being stuck in an organized and ordered life, which she dreads. The protagonist: G.H significantly relates to Tim O’Brien’s definition of a “True War Story”, through her denial that the truth is centered on humanization, shared beliefs over time deemed true by human beings in society, and ultimately believes that the truth is made known through the physical matter inside a living creature that empowers he/she/it to live. This complies to O’Brien’s definition of a “True War Story” which through the account of his novel, The Thing’s They Carried , is the mixing of story- truth, what was emotionally imagined or felt by the main character loosely based on happening-truth, what actually occurred in reality. Focusing on what the author internally felt during war, which he then translated into his own understanding of war loosely based on actual occurrences is O’Brien’s pursuit for what he believes to be a “True War Story”, similar to how Lispector uses G.H to focus on the importance of the internal essence of human matter as the predominately true representation of life over what is outwardly represented and deemed as true.
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