reggea - 10/18/07 Mr. G The Birth of Reggae Recovering from...

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10/18/07 Mr. G The Birth of Reggae Recovering from its wounds from the long struggle to gain independence, in the 1950’s Jamaica did something unique, not done anywhere else in the world. In an attempt to escape the harsh realities at home, a massive influx of people flooded the capitol of Kingston, to garner a piece of the growing economy. Thousands of people flocked through the streets to massive open areas called “lawns.” There they would all gather together forgetting all their sorrows, to bath in positive vibes of music. In the lawns disc-jockeys would set up massive sound systems, blazing all the latest jazz and R&B hits from the United States. This was a way for the inhabitants to just let go and be happy, taking in the calm soothing beats, and basking in the fresh ocean breezes, unknowingly creating the laid back easygoing culture of Jamaica that we know today. This is how reggae was born. The great majority of the population was poor, and could not afford their own record players, so the lawns were a way to experience all the latest music. The preferred style in Jamaica was R&B, but with the advent of Rock N Roll, American production of
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This note was uploaded on 04/22/2008 for the course ENGL 101 taught by Professor Wormer during the Spring '08 term at North Texas.

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reggea - 10/18/07 Mr. G The Birth of Reggae Recovering from...

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