The Rational Choice theory

The Rational Choice theory - The Rational Choice Theory and...

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The Rational Choice Theory and Violence in America David P. Rankin CRJUS 5831 The Rational Choice theory to me is the Occam’s razor of the theories of violence, bluntly put, the easiest, simplest answer is usually the best and the right one. Same holds for our theories in criminal justice, why do people do what they do, why do people commit violence? The answer is simple, when a human being is faced with an adverse enemy, it is our nature to eliminate it or remove your self from the situation, fight or flight. You may think that this is only suitable in self-defense situations or situations alike, but in some instances, such as even child murder, the rational choice theory is the best answer to why. I am not justifying in anyway the actions of some of my fellow man I am simply trying to put a grasp on to why. In the book, Felson (2004) looks at the Rational Choice theory through the frustration-aggression perspective. The dictionary definition of frustration is something that comes from an outside unresolved problem or issue, some type of stressor that frustrates that individual, the only way to rid one’s self of stress as most of us are aware is to find an outlet for it. A frustrating occurrence could be you simply having a bad day, to echo a bad country song and to add some
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This essay was uploaded on 04/22/2008 for the course CRJUS 5830 taught by Professor All during the Spring '08 term at Youngstown State University.

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The Rational Choice theory - The Rational Choice Theory and...

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