Euglena Phototaxy Lab

Euglena Phototaxy Lab - Phototaxis in Euglena gracilis and...

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Phototaxis in Euglena gracilis and the Effects of Viscosity on Paramecium Abstract Euglenas have been known to exhibit positive phototaxis due to their photosynthetic nature. This experiment investigated the reaction of Euglena to light, comparing the number of Euglena present in the field of view to the number of Euglena present with a black paper dividing the field of view in half. I hypothesized that since Euglenas undergo photosynthesis, the number of Euglenas present in the light will increase as time goes by. Using black paper to cover up half of the field of view, I compared the number of Euglena present to each time period of 2 minutes for a total of 10 minutes. During the experiment, it was evident that the number of Euglena was decreasing over time, contrary to my stated hypothesis. Comparing this result to those obtained from the control experiment, it is clear that the number of Euglena decrease in light as time goes by. According to the obtained results, it can be inferred that due to the heat of the light, the Euglena died off. The viscosity of water is known to affect the mobility of paramecium and is the key factor in the purpose of this next experiment – to relate the effects of viscosity of the water to the paramecium’s velocity in the water. I hypothesized that as the water becomes more viscous, the paramecium will slow down to an eventual halt. To evaluate this theory, I first added concentrations of carboxymethylcellulose and recorded the paramecium’s velocity for each dose until the paramecium was relatively immobile. For the control group, I added further concentrations of water to the paramecium, where it was evident that the paramecium’s velocity increased as the solution became less viscous. From these results, it can be concluded that the more viscous the water is, the slower the paramecium will move. Introduction
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Euglena Phototaxy Lab - Phototaxis in Euglena gracilis and...

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