UFC Paper - John Brinck Jason M Fri 1pm Ultimate Fighting...

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John Brinck 10/9/07 Jason M Fri 1pm Ultimate Fighting, Violence, and Culture Recently recognized as America’s fastest growing sport, Ultimate Fighting Championship captivates millions of people (Campbell). In 2006, the UFC broke the pay-per-view business’s all- time record for a single year of business when it generated over $222,766,000 in revenue. This is the highest revenue ever grossed on pay-per-view (Campbell). However, its televised displays of mixed martial arts without mercy have enraged many, and it was initially banned in 36 states. As it is such a controversial and popular topic, I sought out to understand the contrasting views of UFC and its overt display of violence. I chose my informants in order to highlight the different cultural beliefs held by those of diverse sexes, races, and age groups. I interviewed Chris Roche, a caucasian 19 year old USC student, Colin Mease, an African-American 19 year old USC student, and Susan Brinck, a Caucasian 54 year old school teacher. As these informants come from diverse backgrounds, I anticipated ascertaining mixed feedback on the violence in UFC. My method was quite simple: I sat my informants down with a tape recorder and proceeded to ask them a series of scripted questions, yet when appropriate, I let the conversation carry itself and ventured off of the script in discussion. My informants behaved almost exactly as I expected each would. Chris Roche, a volleyball player from Redondo Beach, expressed mild dislike for UFC and its copious amounts of violence. He found it “unnecessary and sometimes stupid” to watch two grown men attempt to severely injure each other. Chris remarked “violence shouldn’t be used to entertain like in UFC” and “all it is, is two people getting beat up and hurting each other for no reason.” Despite this, Chris doesn’t dislike or frown upon UFC fighters and its enthusiasts, he says he “doesn’t pass judgment, he’s just not a fan.” Contrastingly, Colin Mease, a 19 year old from Los Angeles, raves about UFC and its combat. Colin
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exclaimed “I love seeing guys getting knocked out. The techniques and athleticism of these fighters is crazy.” He doesn’t personally use the UFC moves because he isn’t properly trained, but if he could learn Colin says he would “love to punch some dudes like they do on television.” Colin watches UFC
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