Unit-3-tutorials-the-united-states-at-mid-century-1939-1969.pdf

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Unit 3 Tutorials: The United States atMid-Century: 1939-1969INSIDE UNIT 3The United States and WWII: 1939-1945Neutrality to InvolvementThe American HomefrontArsenal of DemocracyFighting World War IITruman and the Atomic BombThe Cold War at Home and Abroad: 1945-1960Origins of the Cold WarThe Cold War in Europe: The Iron Curtain DescendsThe Cold War in AmericaFamily Life in the 1950sThe Civil Rights Movement: 1945-1963The Origins of Brown V BoardThe Consequences of Brown V BoardCold War and the Civil Rights MovementThe Polarized 1960s: 1960-1969The Cold War ContinuesThe Early 1960sJohnson's Vision: The Great SocietyThe Liberal Coalition UnravelsThe Rise of Identity Politics in AmericaThe Significance of 1968Neutrality to Involvementby Sophia Tutorial© 2022 SOPHIA Learning, LLC. SOPHIA is a registered trademark of SOPHIA Learning, LLC.Page 1
Much of the world outside the United States was also impacted by the Great Depression. During thecrisis, militaristic, totalitarian regimes came to power in Europe while, in Asia, Japan expanded itsborders. As the likelihood of another world war increased, President Roosevelt worked to convinceAmericans that international involvement was in their best interest.This tutorial examines the origins of American involvement in World War II in four parts:1. The Myth of American Isolationism2. Dictatorships and Militarism Abroad3. From American Neutrality...4. ...to American Involvement1. The Myth of American IsolationismAt the end of World War I, Congress refused to ratify the Treaty of Versailles. As a result, the U.S. did notparticipate in the League of Nations — an international body that sought to resolve disputes throughdiscussion and negotiation.The fact that many Americans during the 1920s and 1930s were wary of international involvement has ledsome historians (and students) to conclude that the United States was isolationist, or that it sought towithdraw from global affairs entirely, during this period.Some historians challenge this conclusion. The U.S. continued to oversee the affairs of Latin American nationsduring this period. As American troops withdrew from countries they temporarily occupied, the U.S.established relations with several dictators in the region. These leaders imposed authoritarian rule on theirnations and enacted policies favorable to U.S. economic and agricultural interests.In European affairs, the U.S. avoided agreements that might limit its ability to act independently. Somehistorians argue that this was in keeping with the foreign policy tradition ofunilateralism.TERM TO KNOWUnilateralismConducting foreign affairs with minimal or no consultation with other nations, including alliesIn 1928, the United States and 14 European nations signed the Kellogg-Briand Pact, which declared war to bean international crime. One of the reasons that the U.S. supported the pact was that it did not requiresignatory nations to assist each other in the event of military attack.

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