Bad Case Immunity: Philosophy Midterm

Bad Case Immunity: Philosophy Midterm - Andrew MacKenzie...

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Andrew MacKenzie February 1 st , 2008 Sennet Philosophy 001 I Think, Therefore I Am: Bad Case Immunity “I think, therefore I am.” It’s one of the most common philosophical quotes of all time, yet surprisingly few of the public understand its significance. Descartes was the philosopher who developed this statement as an exception to skepticism. The skeptical argument is that it is impossible to truly know something, for any number of reasons. Skepticism looks at reality in two ways: a ‘good case’ and a ‘bad case’. In the good case, reality is as we perceive it, and things are as they seem. The bad case is basically the opposite. Everything that I know could actually just be a dream, or my brain in a jar, or an evil demon could be manipulating all of my senses to make me believe everything exists. The bad case covers everything that we could possibly know, with one exception. There is no bad case for the statement “I exist.” The reason why “I exist” is immune from a bad case is explained in Descartes’
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2008 for the course PHI 001 taught by Professor Sennet during the Winter '08 term at UC Davis.

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Bad Case Immunity: Philosophy Midterm - Andrew MacKenzie...

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